“I don’t create gay sites.” The US court agrees

“I don’t create gay sites.”  The US court agrees

New York Despite not being in the White House for almost three years and being crushed by various trials at the state and federal levels, Donald Trump continues to impress …

Premium article access and all site content
With a dedicated app, newsletters, podcasts and live updates.

special offer

best offer

annual

79.99 euros

19 euros
for a year

Choose now

monthly

6.99 euros

1 euro per month
for 6 months

Choose now

special offer

best offer

annual

79.99 euros

11.99 euros
for a year

Choose now

monthly

6.99 euros

2 euros per month
for 12 months

Choose now

– or –

Subscribe by paying with Google

special offer

Read the full article and website on ilmessaggero.it

One year for €9.99 89.99 euros

or
1 euro per month for 6 months

Automatic renewal. Turn it off whenever you want.


  • Unlimited access to articles on the site and in the application
  • 7:30 Good morning newsletter
  • Ore18 newsletter for today’s updates
  • Podcasts of our signatures
  • Insights and live updates

New York despite not being in the White House for nearly three years and being mired in numerous state and federal trials, Donald Trump continues to influence American politics. And it’s doing so through the Supreme Court, which the three justices appointed to pay back for its support of an evangelical election that made it the most conservative in decades.

A gay artist posts photos of him kissing the boy, and the parish suspends him and cancels summer camp

See also  USA Sixth consecutive out-election Republican McCarthy as Speaker of the House of Representatives. Biden: 'It's embarrassing'

“I don’t create gay sites”

Following the decision made two days ago to end affirmative action that allowed universities to guarantee access to ethnic minorities, the Supreme Court ruled yesterday on two other central issues of the social life of the United States, questioning some of the civil gains shared by the majority of American citizens.

the story
Yesterday morning, in a decision of six in favor — the far-right majority — and three against, the justices agreed with Colorado web designer Lori Smith, who appealed the First Amendment to the Constitution, and he refused. Work towards marriage to a gay couple, claiming that he did not want to create messages contrary to his religious beliefs. Neil M. Gorsuch, speaking on behalf of the conservative majority, said that “The First Amendment imagines the United States as a rich and complex place in which all people are free to think and speak as they please, not as the government requires.” Conversely, Progressive Judge Sonia Sotomayor believes the decision is “deeply wrong” and that it is against Colorado’s anti-discrimination law. US President Joe Biden attacked the option: “This decision weakens anti-discrimination laws. I am deeply concerned that the decision may lead to further discrimination against LGBT+ Americans.”

former
This is not the first case of this kind: in 2018, another similar decision of the Supreme Court sparked a lot of debate, which proved right a pastry chef in Colorado who refused to bake a wedding cake for a same-sex couple. In fact, the position taken by the Supreme Court once again proves correct, in the name of freedom of expression, a right-wing, ultra-conservative and evangelical minority which according to various polls has very limited representation in the country. Specifically on issues related to same-sex marriage, abortion policies, and college admissions policies, Democrats and Republicans have opinions that are far removed from those of the ultraconservatives. There’s more: In fact, in the 2022 midterm elections, all of the candidates with the right-wing, anti-abortion, homophobic platform Trump supports disastrously lost. For this reason, many observers see this extreme right-wing of American jurisprudence as imposing views entirely separate from the majority of the American public.

See also  The FBI in the Trump home, the US Attorney General breaks the silence of the White House: "I approved the operation, it is all ordinary: unjust attacks on agents"

But the issue of gay discrimination is not the only attack on civil rights and Biden’s policies. Also yesterday with the same 6-3 majority, the Supreme Court rejected Biden’s plan to cancel more than $400 billion in debt for millions of students: The justices argue the decision cannot be made by executive order, but must be passed by Congress, which would Most likely stopping him given the Republican majority in the House of Representatives. Last August, Biden announced his intention to donate $10,000 to people who earn less than $125,000 a year, and $20,000 to less affluent families: in total, nearly 26 million applications have come in and 16 million have already been approved. This is an unimaginable decision. “The fight is far from over,” Biden said as he prepared for a series of new measures to protect students. In addition to attacking civil rights, the Supreme Court has blocked several central points on Biden’s agenda in the past two years, on topics such as measures to stem climate change, blocking evictions during a pandemic and mandatory vaccinations for large businesses.

Read the full article
on the messenger

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *