David Trueba reflects Woody Allen

David Trueba reflects Woody Allen

Over the course of two weeks, Movistar Plus+ dedicated a cross-platform channel solely to Woody Allen, streaming twenty-nine of his fifty films. As a culmination of this tribute, they complemented it with an interview conducted by David Trueba with the director. A Day in New York with Woody Allen Its events take place in the director's offices. The program begins with a visual montage in which Trouba's solo walk through Manhattan is mixed with scenes from the American director's films, in such a way that from the first minute a very strange game appears: one that reinforces the simulation between the two protagonists. . The physical resemblance is emphasized when both directors sit opposite each other. The similarity between eyeglass frames, hairstyle or design and wardrobe shades creates a mirror appearance. The effect is coercive similar…a similar person, He searches for an equation between the two characters, building an almost metaphysical harmony. Trouba begins the program by clarifying his journalistic intentions: “Woody Allen has been more present in the media in recent years because of personal conflicts than because of his cinema. However, it was his cinema that brought us to New York to talk to him.. It's a way of warning viewers that he's not planning to make any attempt to question Allen about the child molestation allegations, to use the euphemism ” “Personal conflicts” To alleviate the dark side of the protagonist. The goal is purely cinematic, but it is clear that, despite everything, everyone who is interviewing him feels the need to justify himself. It's clear, then, that this is a conversation between filmmakers and filmmakers, one that begins with no frills of thanks. A short greeting and a passing reference to the chair where Allen will be sitting in a simple room. Window decorated with New York landscapes all around from a great height. It is such a symbolism of appearance that has already gained a lively perspective. Despite everything, Woody Allen does not lose momentum and seems to start the conversation begging an investor for the next project, adaptable to any situation or geographical location. Trueba remains in the role of strict questioner, without free flattery or complacent attitude to please the interlocutor. Instead, he seems to want to gain her trust by talking tough about what they have in common: a love of cinema. Trueba reviews his career. The choice of cinematic language as an expressive resource, the influences of European cinema, and the mention of specific films represent a turning point in his career. Trueba, perhaps because of the venerable age of his interlocutor, at 88, seems at some point to fear for his memory. When he asks The purple rose of Cairo Add “Do you remember her?” As if he was thinking about the possibility that the director had forgotten his film. Trueba questions working with actors, the cinematic process, love and crime as eternal and universal arguments, but also of magic as a recurring theme. He seems to know all the answers to the questions you ask him. Despite everything, the dialogue becomes an interesting and interesting, perhaps too conventional, interview, with questions that Woody Allen doesn't need to think much about. The interview concludes with his question about the future of cinema, and the program ends with Sukari’s regret about the development of this art and Allen as a phenomenon and the end of a stage. The finale contains just the right amount of drama to turn the interview into another little story of what's happening in New York.

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