The princess sighed hypocritically

The princess sighed hypocritically

Journalistic talk shows (which often feature no journalists at all) know that they have an easy way of taking any media issue by pointing out the mistakes of the journalists themselves. Yelling at self-criticism always feels good, and it's free. And yes, self-criticism is necessary, but too often it is resorted to out of pure narcissism. Now, for example, we have a very clear case of this in relation to Kate Middleton and her cancer. We have seen so many crocodile tears and heard so many voices of remorse because “look what we did to this poor woman, all she did was face cancer in the family, and in the meantime, she sniffed, trapped her with our doubts, snuff.” Eh, let's see, a moment. May he who invented fairy tales, lovers, illicit affairs, or conspiracies based on absurd hypotheses repent; Whoever leaked that the ever-black BBC logo had been dyed black to express veiled mourning like the death of Paul McCarty on the front page of Abbey Road should go to the lunatic asylum. All this, in the fire. But those who demanded clarification about the future queen's condition have nothing to regret. The princess, the future queen, who was prematurely crowned by the enthusiasm with which the media responded to her natural charm, and who disappears and devotes herself to publishing manipulated images to deceive those who pay her salary, must assume that the public magnifying glass will be thrown at him. He would just be missing out. Do you have cancer and we send him our best wishes and all our solidarity. Sincerely, but hypocritical tears to look good are far worse than the futile cruelty of the demand on public servants. Including the amazing servers.

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