February 4, 2023

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We talk online on Science Thursday about new treatment approaches for Alzheimer’s disease

L’Alzheimer’s It is a frightening disease because it has great repercussions for both the sufferer and his family members.

New therapies are being discussed today, Thursday 26th January at 5.45pm at live broadcast on www.giovediscienza.it Instruction formwith a neuroscientist Maria Teresa FerrettiAt the meeting entitled:Unstable mind. A new approach to Alzheimer’s disease“.

Alzheimer’s disease manifests in old age but is not an inevitable consequence of aging. Because of the buildup of a neurotoxin due to a protein imbalance, the disease takes several years to develop, which is good news.

Today it can actually be diagnosed in advance, through tests such as MRI, PET or cerebrospinal fluid analysis, and from the perspective of a more reassuring blood sample.

If it goes untreated, it can be mitigated: There are drugs already in use, others in the process of being approved and new treatments on the horizon. Above all, it can be prevented through an appropriate lifestyle: a balanced diet, physical activity and cognitive stimulation, and possibly avoidance of pollution.

The past 20 years of research have brought historic progress in understanding the disease as well as in developing new solutions to prevent and control it, opening new hope for patients and families.

Maria Teresa Ferretti She is a neuroscientist and neuroimmunologist, an expert in Alzheimer’s disease and sex medicine, and an external instructor at the Medical University of Vienna. She is the co-founder and scientific director of the Women’s Brain Project, a nonprofit organization dedicated to the study of gender specificity and the importance of precision medicine in neuropsychiatric diseases. She was a TED-x speaker in 2019 and 2021. For Edizioni Mondo Nuovo, in 2021 she wrote Headless Girl, with Antonella Santuccione Chadda, and in 2022 Alzheimer Revolution.

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