“Matrix” sits on the toilet bowl

“Matrix” sits on the toilet bowl

Exactly 25 years ago, a movie called “The Matrix” was advertised with trailers showing people doing flying karate fights, and since my interest in martial arts stories was extinguished forever with “Karate a Muerte in Bangkok,” I stopped going there. My fault The people who went there when he played often have an indelible memory and share a generational canon. Science fiction does just that: it creates worlds that can be shared and allows us to see impossible realities that overwhelm the place and time in which we were born, which is part of the primal, existential goals of cinema. After all, Méliès, the man who took the first steps in creating cinematic language, was a juggler by profession and ran a juggler's theatre. When he attended as a guest the premiere of the Lumière brothers' cinema, the first thing that came to his mind was the possibilities of illusion generated by the new invention, and the tricks of his famous book A Trip to the Moon, from 1902, which we still admire today. From Méliès to The Matrix there is a common thread that takes us straight to artificial intelligence, the new frontier of image creation. Many industry professionals are terrified and opposed to AI at the prospect of taking their jobs, but this is a door that can no longer be closed and will lead to new frontiers of visual imagination. On one condition: that we could see them in the cinema on a big screen, as we saw Moses conquer the Red Sea or Hal challenge the Commander in 2001. They could be watched on TV in the dining room at home, or on a mobile phone sitting on the toilet bowl, “The Matrix” was not To create indelible memories. We'd be stupid to miss it.

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