History of the American Flag

History of the American Flag
reading time: 4 minutes

The American flag, also known as Old Glory or the Stars and Stripes, is one of the most recognizable symbols of the United States of America. Its history dates back to the founding of the state.

History of science

The first American flag was created in 1777 during the American Revolutionary War by a congressional committee that included George Washington. The original flag had 13 alternating red and white stripes and 13 white stars on a blue field in the upper left corner, representing the thirteen colonies that declared independence from the United Kingdom.

Over the years, the flag has undergone several changes depending on how many countries have joined the union. In 1795, a design of 15 stars and 15 stripes was introduced, representing the first 15 states in the United States. In 1818, Congress decided to go back to the original thirteen stripes and add a new star for each state that joined the union.

The last change to the flag dates back to July 4, 1960, when the star n. 50 in honor of Hawaii, the last state to join the union. So the current American flag contains 50 white stars on a blue field and 13 alternating red and white stripes.

The American flag has been at the center of many historic moments, such as the Battle of Fort McHenry during the Anglo-American War of 1812, when British bombing inspired the US national anthem “The Star-Spangled Banner.” It was also an important symbol during the American Civil War and in the civil rights struggles of the 1960s.

Today, the American flag flies over government buildings, schools, and private homes across the country, and is used as a symbol of the United States’ national identity.

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The colors of the flag have important meanings. Red stands for toughness and valor, white stands for purity and innocence, and blue stands for vigilance, perseverance and justice.

Few people know that the current flag, with 50 stars and 13 stripes, was designed in 1958 by Robert J. 17-year-old Hift, from Lancaster, Ohio. President Dwight D. Eisenhower chose his project from among 1,500 applications from several American high schools.

The 13 Colonies

The Thirteen American Colonies were a series of British settlements along the eastern coast of North America, which eventually gave rise to the present-day United States of America. It was founded in the 17th century and represents an essential part of American history, as it was the foundation of the struggle for American independence from Great Britain.

The thirteen colonies were divided into three groups: the New England Colonies (Massachusetts, Rhode Island, Connecticut, and New Hampshire), the Middle Colonies (New York, New Jersey, Pennsylvania, and Delaware), and the Southern Colonies (Virginia, Maryland, North Carolina, South Carolina, and Georgia).

Each colony has its own history and distinctive features. The New England colonies, for example, were largely made up of religious Puritans seeking to create a society based on Biblical principles. On the other hand, the southern colonies were distinguished by a strong agricultural economy based on the cultivation of tobacco and later cotton.

The colonies were governed by a colonial system of government, which in turn was subject to the suzerainty of Great Britain. However, during the eighteenth century, tensions between the colonies and Great Britain began to increase. The colonies were heavily taxed, with no representation in the British Parliament, which led to protest from the colonists and the rise of the independence movement.

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On July 4, 1776, representatives of the Thirteen Colonies met in Philadelphia and signed the Declaration of Independence, officially declaring their independence from Great Britain. This event marks the beginning of the American Revolutionary War, which lasted from 1775 to 1783 and saw the Thirteen Colonies unite to fight against the British Army.

At the end of the war, the thirteen colonies were united into a new country, the United States of America, founded on the principles of freedom and democracy. The thirteen colonies left an indelible mark on American history and remain an essential part of the national identity of the United States today.

50 US states

Far West, red dust, desert…. This is how we can easily identify the Grand Canyon country…. A few cacti here and there… grass that rolls on undisturbed and is easy…

They were discovered by James Cook and named the Sandwich Islands in honor of the British diplomat … The most isolated islands in the world, 4000 km from the main continent …

The longest coast in America, 10,000 km long…. The last frontier, the last frontier…. This is how this unique state, along with the Hawaiian Islands, is called to be …

A region that does not at times look like America, a country that seems to have stopped in some ways in past centuries… a land of magic… a land…

How would we describe the country we are going to discover today in just three words? Simple…the desert, Mormons, and Monument Valley…clearly we’ve come to Utah! The name is very…

“Why should I”…. The state we are going to actually explore today is what I consider to be the real land of cowboys, the land…

We stay in an area of ​​the United States where nature dominates. In fact, I am personally convinced that the countries where this concept was introduced …

“When the white men came in, they drank the alcohol and we the land… They told us ‘Drink and close your eyes’… And when we opened it again,…

“For the indigenous people, legends are sacred…as is hope and a vision of the future. For them everything depends on the relationship with the land…

Still High Midwest, still High Plains… Today we will almost reach Canada, to discover one of the least touristy states in the United States… North Dakota! Roosevelt, in…

Today we fly to the ROCKY MOUNTAINS area, in that state that uses the moniker CENTENNIAL STATE, as it joined the union…

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