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Mystery Statistics Theater: Power Forward Edition

Welcome to the fourth edition of Mystery Statistics Theater, an ongoing series here at Hardwood Paroxysm. In this space, Conrad Kaczmarek and I will be attempting to do the previously impossible; we’ll be removing all personal bias from our conclusions. Here and in the subsequent editions of this series, this is what you’ll find: a comparison of the per-36 minutes and advanced statistics lines of two different players – one from this season and one from a randomly selected season – with no names attached. Our task was to decide which of the two players was better, or more valuable, or which we’d rather have on our team; whatever you want to call it, we chose between the two players without knowing who they really were. You can see the comparisons, conclusions and corresponding player names below. Enjoy.

(NOTE: We used per-36 minutes rather than per-game stats to marginalize and/or eliminate any differences in playing time. Additionally, we recognize that these comparisons do not account for team context or player roles. Rather, this exercise intends to demonstrate how simply looking at the numbers can lead you to conclusions that may seem counter-intuitive, for better or worse, and that surface opinions and bias can lead to drastically different conclusions than simply analyzing the stats. Also, we whited out the player names so you can play along for fun! All stats current through March 30, 2012.)

Comparison #1 – Created by Jared, Analyzed by Conrad

Player A seems like a pretty obvious call to me. He’s got a better TS% and is just about even in total rebounding rate. What he lacks in blocked shots, he makes up for with steals. I can’t really find anything wrong with Player A when it comes to what I want out of a power forward. Furthermore, he doesn’t take three-pointers while Player B occasionally does. For that alone, I hate Player B.

(Player A – Carlos Boozer 2011-12, Player B – Pau Gasol 2011-12)

Note: Highlight the line above this to reveal player names

Comparison #2 – Created by Jared, Analyzed by Conrad

Not much to dislike about Player B. He’s a wildly efficient scorer, solid rebounder, and a fantastic offensive rebounder. I’m terrified of picking him because I think I know who it is and it might be a result of a small sample size. Regardless, based on these stats, there’s no reason for me to take Player A over Player B. Give me Player B, even though I’m really scared.

(Player A – Tim Duncan 1997-98, Player B – Kenneth Faried 2011-12)

Note: Highlight the line above this to reveal player names

Comparison #3 – Created by Jared, Analyzed by Conrad

These guys are virtually identical in a number of statistics, except for one of the most important: true shooting percentage. In that area, Player B can’t come close to Player A’s efficiency. Similarly, while ORtg and DRtg aren’t the most accurate ways to determine a player’s value, the 107-99 gap in ORtg is somewhat significant. Because I’m a huge nerd, I know who Player B is and I absolutely love him. I also know that these stats don’t come close to explaining what he does on the court. The assist % of 20.6% is wildly impressive, but Player A is right there behind him. Going off of these numbers, I’m forced to take Player A and I’m okay with that, because he’s an incredible player as well.

(Player A – Kevin Garnett 2011-12, Player B – Josh Smith 2011-12)

Note: Highlight the line above this to reveal player names

Comparison #4 – Created by Conrad, Analyzed by Jared

Let’s see here. Player B seems like the kind of player you can build your offense around. He’s got a 29+ usage, gets to the line a good amount and has solid percentages from everywhere. Player A is a long-range sniper – 8.0 of his 14.0 FGA per-36 come from behind the 3-point line and he hits at a 41.5% clip. Player A is the better offensive rebounder and turns it over less (though the TOs might have something to do with their usage). Player B, though, is a much better passer, defensive rebounder and is better at shooting inside the arc and getting to the line. This is insanely close, but I’ll take Player B, the more well-rounded player, as the foundation of the offense.

(Player A – Ryan Anderson 2011-12, Player B – Dirk Nowitzki 2011-12)

Note: Highlight the line above this to reveal player names

Comparison #5 – Created by Cornad, Analyzed by Jared

I hate bad free throw shooters. Player A’s 54.3% mark from the line is hella-concerning. That said, he does get to the line an awful lot, which is a plus. And he’s shooting over 8.0% better from the field than Player B. Then again, Player B is a better rebounder and free throw shooter. But since Player A has the advantage in everything else (passing, TOs, blocks, usage, D-Rtg) and he isn’t deluded into taking two 3′s a game at just 33.0%, I’ll take him despite the awful FT%.

(Player A – Blake Griffin 2011-12, Player B – Kevin Love 2009-10)

Note: Highlight the line above this to reveal player names

Comparison #6 – Created by Conrad, Analyzed by Jared

HOLY BLOCKS, PLAYER A!!!! You seem like more of a complementary piece than a foundational player, but what you do, you do ridiculously well. Offensive rebounding, blocking shots and making your own FGs. Player B doesn’t have the defensive counting stats but does have a similar D-Rtg, gets to the line more, makes his own fair share of shots and seems like he’s a better passer and point producer. He’s got a higher usage, by a lot, gets to the line more and makes a higher percentage of his FTs. Player B is probably the better player, but I’m going with Player A because of the blocks and rebounds. Hopefully I have other scorers on my squad.

(Player A – Serge Ibaka 2011-12, Player B – Amar’e Stoudemire 2011-12)

Note: Highlight the line above this to reveal player names

Comparison #7 – Created by Conrad, Analyzed by Jared

This is really tough, but I’m going with Player B because of his ability to simultaneously crash the offensive boards and kill it from the 3-point line. The two players seem to be about equal in the defensive counting stats, and I’m willing to guess Player A just plays on a better team and that’s why his D-Rtg is better. Player A is a lot better passer, but that’s really his only big time advantage. So Player B it is.

(Player A – Kevin Garnett 2011-12, Player B – Ersan Ilyasova 2011-12)

Note: Highlight the line above this to reveal player names

Mystery Statistics Theater: Small Forward Edition

Welcome to the third edition (click here for the first and second editions) of Mystery Statistics Theater, a new series here at Hardwood Paroxysm. Over the next few days, Conrad Kaczmarek and I (Jared Dubin) will be attempting to do the previously impossible; we’ll be removing all personal bias from our conclusions. Here and in the subsequent editions of this series, this is what you’ll find: a comparison of the per-36 minutes and advanced statistics lines of two different players – one from this season and one from a randomly selected season – with no names attached. Our task was to decide which of the two players was better, or more valuable, or which we’d rather have on our team; whatever you want to call it, we chose between the two players without knowing who they really were. You can see the comparisons, conclusions and corresponding player names below. Enjoy.

(NOTE: We used per-36 minutes rather than per-game stats to marginalize and/or eliminate any differences in playing time. Additionally, we recognize that these comparisons do not account for team context or player roles. Rather, this exercise intends to demonstrate how simply looking at the numbers can lead you to conclusions that may seem counterintuitive, for better or worse, and that surface opinions and bias can lead to drastically different conclusions than simply analyzing the stats. Also, we whited out the player names so you can play along for fun! All stats current through February 16, 2011.)

Mystery #1 – Created by Jared, Analyzed by Conrad

Like always, this is basically a toss-up. The stats are so incredibly similar except that Player B contributes more in the way of assists. It’s not a coincidence that Player B also turns the ball more often. I like my small forwards to be well rounded, but if the player simply isn’t being asked to work as a facilitator on his team, you can’t really fault him for having low assists totals. My assessment is that Player A is doing everything he’s asked to do. He’s scoring significantly more efficiently than Player B and has a lower usage rate. To me, it seems that Player A is playing his role pretty much perfectly in what seems to be an incredibly effective offense. I’ll lean towards Player A.

(Player A – Danilo Gallinari 2011-12, Player B – Paul Pierce 2011-12)

Note: Highlight the line above this to reveal player names

Mystery #2 – Created by Jared, Analyzed by Conrad

Give me Player B. There’s not a ton that stands out here other than the fact that Player B contributes a little bit more across the board. The scoring efficiency is not a big enough margin to really impact my decision. Player B gets it done on the glass and scores almost as well as Player A. I don’t feel strongly about my decision, but I’ll stand by it. Slight edge to Player B.

(Player A – Caron Butler 2011-12, Player B – Shawn Marion 2011-12)

Note: Highlight the line above this to reveal player names

Mystery #3 – Created by Jared, Analyzed by Conrad

Player A, you’re doing too much. With a usage rate of 32.7%, I’d expect phenomenal numbers across the board. You aren’t doing that. It’s possible that Player A is still a better player than Player B, but I don’t need my small forward using that many possessions if he’s going to score inefficiently and turn the ball over that often. Player B does most things efficiently, he just isn’t being asked to do so much. I’ll take Player B because there’s no way I want a guy on my team if he uses a third of our possessions and is shooting less than 40% from the field. And 4.3 threes per 36 minutes while shooting 29.7%? Get that all the way out of here.

(Player A – Carmelo Anthony 2011-12, Player B – Marvin Williams 2011-12)

Note: Highlight the line above this to reveal player names

Mystery #4 – Created by Jared, Analyzed by Conrad

Very similar in basically every category. The only difference that stands out to me is the scoring efficiency (FG%, TS%, eFG%). When two players are essentially equal in counting stats across the board, I’ll take the guy who shoots a better percentage and doesn’t waste as many possessions. That was easy. Give me Player B  – please and thank you.

(Player A – Luol Deng 2011-12, Player B – Gerald Wallace 2011-12)

Note: Highlight the line above this to reveal player names

Mystery #5 – Created by Conrad, Analyzed by Jared

Player A is my guy here. He’s not as good of a rebounder or play-maker and shoots slightly worse from three (not enough for me to really quibble about, 41.2% is really good), but he does just about everything else better. He’s more efficient with his offensive production (see: higher TS%, eFG%, O-Rtg), especially from inside the arc – Player B’s 3P% is higher than his FG% – and while the two players have the exact same defensive rating, Player A gets more steals and blocks. Player A also gets to the line more often and shoots a better percentage when he’s there. His offensive efficiency and defensive counting stats are enough to override the disadvantage in the rebounding and assists department.

(Player A – Nic Batum 2011-12, Player B – Marvin Williams 2011-12)

Note: Highlight the line above this to reveal player names

Mystery #6 – Created by Conrad, Analyzed by Jared

This time I’m going with Player B. His vastly superior defense (99 D-Rtg as opposed to 112 for Player A) pretty much made the decision for me, but there are other things to like here too. He’s got advantages in TS% and eFG%, gets to the line 20% more often and shoots 8% better when he’s there. And then there are those assists; look at that advantage in the play-making department. Player B is so versatile. He scores, rebounds, defends and distributes, and that’s why he’s my pick.

(Player A – Michael Beasley 2010-11, Player B – Paul Pierce 2011-12)

Note: Highlight the line above this to reveal player names

Mystery #7 – Created by Conrad, Analyzed by Jared

I’m going with Player B again. These guys are pretty similar in that their stats are SO close, but Player A’s got the edge in everything except for 2-point field goals. Go through those stats. He’s got the advantage in every single one. He shoots better from three and from the line, rebounds more, gets more assists, steals and blocks, turns it over less and plays better defense. He even fouls less often. Now if we could just get him to work on making shots from inside the arc… Either way, he’s my guy.

(Player A – Luol Deng 2010-11, Luol Deng 2011-12)

Note: Highlight the line above this to reveal player names

Mystery Statistics Theater: Shooting Guard Edition

Welcome to the second edition (click here for the first edition) of Mystery Statistics Theater, a new series here at Hardwood Paroxysm. Over the next few days, Conrad Kaczmarek and I (Jared Dubin) will be attempting to do the previously impossible; we’ll be removing all personal bias from our conclusions. Here and in the subsequent editions of this series, this is what you’ll find: a comparison of the per-36 minutes and advanced statistics lines of two different players – one from this season and one from a randomly selected season – with no names attached. Our task was to decide which of the two players was better, or more valuable, or which we’d rather have on our team; whatever you want to call it, we chose between the two players without knowing who they really were. You can see the comparisons, conclusions and corresponding player names below. Enjoy.

(NOTE: We used per-36 minutes rather than per-game stats to marginalize and/or eliminate any differences in playing time. Additionally, we recognize that these comparisons do not account for team context or player roles. Rather, this exercise intends to demonstrate how simply looking at the numbers can lead you to conclusions that may seem counterintuitive, for better or worse, and that surface opinions and bias can lead to drastically different conclusions than simply analyzing the stats. Also, we whited out the player names so you can play along for fun!)

Mystery #1 – Created by Jared, Analyzed by Conrad

I’m going to have to go with Player A here. The two players are very similar, but Player A scores a bit more and even more efficiently than Player B. The steals and blocks from Player B almost swayed me that way, but Player A does what you want your shooting guard to do: score. Both guys contribute across the board so it’s close, but I’m leaning slightly towards the scoring ability of Player A. I’m no expert, but I’d also advise Player A to stop taking so many threes. You’re obviously not good at them (just 32.9%), so don’t take so many of them.

(Player A – Kobe Bryant 2009-10, Player B – 2011-12 Dwyane Wade)

Note: Highlight the line above this to reveal player names

Mystery #2 – Created by Jared, Analyzed by Conrad

This is really a matter of opinion and of what stats you value more. Player A is really good at distributing the ball as well as scoring from the SG position. His FG% is pretty poor, but the TS% ends up being nearly identical to Player B. On the other hand, Player B grabs a staggering 8.1 rebounds per 36 minutes. That’s ridiculously impressive from your shooting guard. Because these guys are pretty damn close, I guess I’ll take the cop out and look at the DRTG to break the tie. Player B is grabbing a bunch of rebounds, not scoring a ton (but does it efficiently-ish), and seems to be better at defense than Player A. Ultimately, it’s a toss up, but I’ll go with Player B.

(Player A – Monta Ellis 2011-12, Player B – Evan Turner 2011-12)

Note: Highlight the line above this to reveal player names 

Mystery #3 – Created by Jared, Analyzed by Conrad

We finally get a comparison that I can definitively make a decision on. I’m taking Player A. Player B scores more, and I know that’s what you want from your shooting guard, but Player A shoots an ungodly percentage from 3-point distance, has a semi-ridiculous 61.6 TS% and does some solid work on the boards. Player B is certainly a nice player and the 4.1 assists per 36 minutes are nothing to sneeze at, but the more that I look at these stats, the clearer it is that I want Player A. This obviously has a lot to do with the team that he is on, but an ORTG of 115 and a DRTG of 98? Jeez. Player A all day.

(Player A – Paul George 2011-12, Player B – Jason Terry 2011-12)

Note: Highlight the line above this to reveal player names

Mystery #4 – Created by Jared, Analyzed by Conrad

Once again, I’m going to have to choose Player A. Pretty even stats across the board as far as TS%, TRB%, and usage rates are concerned. The two things that stand out to me are the assist rates and turnover rates. Player A manages to score more per 36-minutes, dish out more assists, AND turn the ball over less often. That’s the guy that I want playing shooting guard for my squad.

(Player A – Joe Johnson 2011-12, Player B – O.J. Mayo 2011-12)

Note: Highlight the line above this to reveal player names

Mystery #5 – Created by Conrad, Analyzed by Jared

This is tough. Other than assists and turnovers, these guys have very similar stats. They both shoot pretty well from the field for guards, and neither is a very good three-point shooter. Player A is slightly better from three, but takes way too many per-36 for a guy shooting that percentage. At least Player B recognizes it as a weakness and doesn’t take very many. Player B turns it over too much for my liking, but Player A’s defensive rating is a preposterously bad 112. Ultimately though, you want your shooting guard to be able to stretch the defense on the offensive end, and Player A is a better offensive player overall (111 to 101 advantage in offensive rating) and a better three-point shooter, so he’s my man. You can hide his defense through schemes, and his good positional rebounding is a plus.

(Player A – MarShon Brooks 2011-12, Player B – Dwyane Wade 2003-04)

Note: Highlight the line above this to reveal player names

Mystery #6 – Created by Conrad, Analyzed by Jared

This is a weird match-up. Player A seemingly has the advantage in every offensive category, but then you look up and Player B has a ridiculous 128 offensive rating and Player A’s is 12 points lower. This is basically a question of whether you like your shooting guard to be your primary offensive option (Player A and his 28.7 USG%) or a hyper-efficient shooter who blends in well with the team concept (Player B and his 21.5 USG% and 64.7 TS%). Player A’s seeming advantage in the play-making department might be due to the fact that he just has the ball a lot more than Player B. I’m taking Player B because it seems like he gives up 90% of the production on 75% the usage.

(Player A – Manu Ginobili 2007-08, Player B – James Harden 2011-12)

Note: Highlight the line above this to reveal player names

Mystery #7 – Created by Conrad, Analyzed by Jared

Player B’s rebounding edge was almost enough for me to take him, because that’s a really good stat line right there. But if you think I’m going to pass up Player A and his 56.6% three-point shooting on 5.0 attempts per-36, you’re out of your mind. So give me Ray Allen (spoilers).

(Player A – Ray Allen 2011-12, Player B – Paul George 2011-12)

Note: Highlight the line above this to reveal player names

Mystery Statistics Theater: Point Guard Edition

Welcome to the first edition of Mystery Statistics Theater, a new series here at Hardwood Paroxysm. Over the next few days, Conrad Kaczmarek and I (Jared Dubin) will be attempting to do the previously impossible; we’ll be removing all personal bias from our conclusions. Here and in the subsequent editions of this series, this is what you’ll find: a comparison of the per-36 minutes and advanced statistics lines of two different players – one from this season and one from a randomly selected season – with no names attached. Our task was to decide which of the two players was better, or more valuable, or which we’d rather have on our team; whatever you want to call it, we chose between the two players without knowing who they really were. You can see the comparisons, conclusions and corresponding player names below. Enjoy.
(NOTE: We used per-36 minutes rather than per-game stats to marginalize and/or eliminate any differences in playing time. Additionally, we recognize that these comparisons do not account for team context or player roles. Rather, this exercise intends to demonstrate how simply looking at the numbers can lead you to conclusions that may seem counterintuitive, for better or worse, and that surface opinions and bias can lead to drastically different conclusions than simply analyzing the stats. Also, we whited out the player names so you can play along for fun!)
Mystery #1 – Created by Conrad, Analyzed by Jared
FG FGA FG% 3P 3PA 3P% FT FTA FT% ORB DRB TRB AST STL BLK TOV PF PTS
6.0 13.5 .445 0.7 2.4 .306 3.2 3.7 .865 0.6 3.2 3.8 6.8 0.8 0.2 2.4 1.9 15.9
6.6 16.5 .402 2.1 6.0 .352 4.5 5.4 .836 0.6 2.9 3.5 8.3 1.0 0.3 4.3 2.0 19.9
TS% eFG% ORB% DRB% TRB% AST% STL% BLK% TOV% USG% ORtg DRtg
.527 .472 2.1 10.7 6.3 34.4 1.3 0.6 13.6 22.8 109 107
.527 .466 1.8 10.3 5.9 45.6 1.5 0.7 18.7 29.9 104 113
Player B has flashier counting stats, but I’m going to go with Player A. Though Player A doesn’t assist on as many or as high a percentage of his team’s baskets, he makes up for it by turning the ball over less per-36 minutes and less often per-100 possessions (and his assist numbers are nothing to sneeze at either). Taking care of the ball is of tantamount importance for a point guard. Additionally, Player A is a better and more efficient shooter than Player B despite the 4 percent deficit in 3P%. His efficiency is what allows for the 6-point advantage in offensive rating, and though defensive rating is often influenced heavily by your teammates, Player B’s 112 is too low to dismiss entirely. Player A’s 107 isn’t great, but it’s better. Taking care of the ball, efficient shooting and defense, that sounds like a point guard to me.
(Player A – Jarrett Jack 2011-12, Player B – Deron Williams 2011-12)
Note: Highlight the line above this to reveal player names
Mystery #2 – Created by Conrad, Analyzed by Jared
FG FGA FG% 3P 3PA 3P% FT FTA FT% ORB DRB TRB AST STL BLK TOV PF PTS
4.2 9.3 .451 1.1 3.2 .348 1.4 1.5 .935 0.5 3.1 3.6 8.9 0.7 0.0 1.9 2.0 10.8
4.5 9.5 .475 0.1 0.6 .233 1.1 1.9 .568 1.2 3.0 4.2 10.8 2.2 0.2 3.3 1.7 10.3
TS% eFG% ORB% DRB% TRB% AST% STL% BLK% TOV% USG% ORtg DRtg
.547 .510 1.5 9.9 5.7 44.4 1.0 0.1 16.2 15.6 115 107
.495 .482 4.5 9.7 7.2 47.1 3.2 0.3 24.3 18.3 104 100
This one is really tough. Do you want an offensive specialist like Player A or a more well-rounded point guard in Player B? Player A has a sizable edge in shooting and turnovers, while Player B has a slight advantages in rebounding and a bigger edge in assists and on defense. A player that is as good of a shooter as Player A is a huge asset, especially at the end of games. A knock-down 93.5 FT% can create a tactical advantage. Player B’s defensive prowess is just as valuable, as collecting 2.2 steals per-36 and holding a 7-point edge in defensive rating is big. His advantage in rebounding and assists is small though, and he turns the ball over almost twice as often. I’m taking the more well-rounded specimen here: give me Player B.
(Player A – Jose Calderon 2011-12, Player B – Rajon Rondo 2010-11)
Note: Highlight the area above this to reveal player names
Mystery #3 – Created by Conrad, Analyzed by Jared
FG FGA FG% 3P 3PA 3P% FT FTA FT% ORB DRB TRB AST STL BLK TOV PF PTS
7.7 17.2 .445 2.3 6.1 .366 2.5 3.0 .820 0.7 2.6 3.3 5.4 1.6 0.2 2.4 1.5 20.0
7.2 16.3 .441 0.2 1.0 .250 3.5 4.5 .780 0.5 2.7 3.2 8.5 1.1 0.0 2.8 1.4 18.1
TS% eFG% ORB% DRB% TRB% AST% STL% BLK% TOV% USG% ORtg DRtg
.541 .510 2.1 8.4 5.2 27.9 2.3 0.5 11.5 26.1 108 104
.496 .449 1.6 8.8 5.2 40.4 1.6 0.1 13.1 27.1 106 106
This is just a ridiculous toss-up. Look how similar those lines are. Points per-36 is within 0.2; rebounds per-36 is within 0.1, turnovers per-36 is within 0.2, offensive rating and defensive rating are both within one. What this decision comes down to is wther you want a guy who is a better long-range shooter and can thus stretch and defense or a guy who is a slightly better distributor and thus will get your other players more and better looks. I was all set to take the distributor (Player B) until I noticed the approximately 10 point advantage in both 3P% and FT% for Player A. Thus, Player A gets my vote.
(Player A – Brandon Jennings 2011-12, Player B – Tony Parker 2007-08)
Note: Highlight the line above this to reveal player names
Mystery #4 – Created by Conrad, Analyzed by Jared
FG FGA FG% 3P 3PA 3P% FT FTA FT% ORB DRB TRB AST STL BLK TOV PF PTS
8.6 16.7 .511 1.4 3.5 .411 4.0 4.9 .821 1.1 3.0 4.1 6.1 0.9 0.6 4.1 3.0 22.6
5.2 12.1 .430 0.6 2.3 .282 5.1 6.0 .847 0.8 4.3 5.1 7.8 2.2 0.1 2.3 2.8 16.1
TS% eFG% ORB% DRB% TRB% AST% STL% BLK% TOV% USG% ORtg DRtg
.597 .554 3.6 10.2 6.8 35.1 1.4 1.2 17.7 28.5 111 107
.546 .456 2.5 14.8 8.5 38.2 3.4 0.2 13.7 22.2 114 104
Holy efficiency, Player A! That’s just a monster season. He’s dangerously close to achieving a 50-40-90 season, the holy grail of shooting in basketball. He makes up for the fact that he’s not averaging as many assists by scoring 6 more points per-36. He’s not as good of a defender, rebounder of free throw shooter; but again, that efficiency. The fact that Player A averages 1.7 assists per-36 less but is still within shouting distance of Player B’s AST% tells me his teammates aren’t very good scorers, and that might be why he’s scoring the basketball more. His defensive stats don’t look great and he turns it over a bit too much, but as a scorer who is that efficient and is still a good distributor, he’s my guy.
(Player A – Kyrie Irving 2011-12, Player B – Chris Paul 2005-06)
Note: Highlight the line above this to reveal player names
Mystery #5 – Created by Jared, Analyzed by Conrad
FG FGA FG% 3P 3PA 3P% FT FTA FT% ORB DRB TRB AST STL BLK TOV PF PTS
5.3 12.6 .418 2.1 5.1 .408 5.4 5.9 .913 0.4 2.7 3.1 6.5 1.2 0.2 2.3 2.1 18.1
7.7 17.2 .445 2.3 6.1 .366 2.5 3.0 .820 0.7 2.6 3.3 5.4 1.6 0.2 2.4 1.5 20.0
TS% eFG% ORB% DRB% TRB% AST% STL% BLK% TOV% USG% ORtg DRtg
.592 .501 1.4 8.4 5.0 28.9 1.7 0.5 13.0 21.7 121 110
.541 .510 2.1 8.4 5.2 27.9 2.3 0.5 11.5 26.1 108 104
Man, this is a close one. Player A scores slightly less, dishes out slightly more assists and has a lower usage rate. Player B has a better FG%, but only gets to the free throw line about half as often as player A. Furthermore, Player A shoots a stellar 40%+ from behind the arc and an incredibly useful 90%+ from the charity stripe. The thing that really gets my attention is their respective offensive and defensive ratings. Player A boasts an offensive rating of 121, which is somewhat ridiculous. His defense isn’t that good, but I’m willing to accept that when the offense that he runs is so effective. Point guard defense doesn’t have a ton of impact on the overall team defense, but the play of a point guard definitely has a big impact on the team’s offensive efficiency. I’m going with Player A.
(Player A – Chauncey Billups 2008-09, Player B – Brandon Jennings 2011-12)
Note: Highlight the line above this to reveal player names
Mystery #6 – Created by Jared, Analyzed by Conrad
FG FGA FG% 3P 3PA 3P% FT FTA FT% ORB DRB TRB AST STL BLK TOV PF PTS
3.9 10.2 .382 0.8 2.4 .354 3.3 4.1 .817 0.4 4.5 4.9 9.3 2.3 0.2 3.4 2.4 12.0
5.5 13.4 .409 0.5 1.6 .296 4.2 5.4 .766 0.5 3.9 4.4 7.9 1.7 0.5 3.6 2.4 15.6
TS% eFG% ORB% DRB% TRB% AST% STL% BLK% TOV% USG% ORtg DRtg
.500 .424 1.4 14.0 7.7 41.7 3.4 0.4 22.1 19.0 104 100
.494 .427 1.5 12.8 6.9 36.0 2.4 1.0 18.6 23.8 100 110
Ew, neither of these guys can score at all. Player A is kind of confusing because he’s shooting a respectable 35% from 3-point land, yet is shooting just 38% from the field overall. In addition to the decent 3-point stroke, he knocks down his free throws which makes me question his field goal percentage even more. Player B just looks like he’s a poor shooting. Both of them seem to distribute the ball pretty well, despite turning the ball over too much for my liking. Ultimately, I’d have to lean towards Player A because he seems to recognize the fact that he doesnt score very well and instead looks to get his teammates better looks.
(Player A – Ricky Rubio 2011-12, Player B – John Wall 2010-11)
Note: Highlight the line above this to reveal player names
Mystery #7 – Created by Jared, Analyzed by Conrad
FG FGA FG% 3P 3PA 3P% FT FTA FT% ORB DRB TRB AST STL BLK TOV PF PTS
4.7 12.2 .387 1.6 4.7 .352 3.6 4.2 .873 1.2 5.2 6.4 8.0 2.0 0.3 3.3 2.7 14.7
5.1 11.1 .463 0.6 1.9 .286 2.2 2.9 .755 1.2 3.3 4.4 8.4 1.6 0.2 2.7 1.9 13.1
TS% eFG% ORB% DRB% TRB% AST% STL% BLK% TOV% USG% ORtg DRtg
.525 .454 3.9 16.3 10.1 33.9 2.9 0.6 19.0 21.6 108 101
.526 .488 4.0 10.0 7.1 35.9 2.2 0.3 17.6 18.7 110 104
Once again, these guys are really damn close. The assist rates are really close and the difference in turnovers isn’t something to get worked up about. There is a pretty big discrepancy in field goal percentage as Player B shoots a respectable 45.2% while Player A is just closing his eyes and hoping it goes in. Also, why the hell is Player A taking 4.7 threes per 36 minutes when he’s shooting just 35.2%? With most of the other important factors pretty equal, I’ve got to go with Player B because Player A needs to learn not to shoot so many threes when he’s this good at running an offense effectively.
(Player A – Kyle Lowry 2011-12, Player B – Andre Miller 2011-12)
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