Brandt Anderson of the Utah Flash Puts His Money Where MJ’s Mouth Is

For the uninitiated, Brandt Anderson owns the Jazz D-League affiliate Utah Flash. He’s a yuckster. He has his fun. He recently tried to get Starbury to sign with the Flash which is logistically impossible.  He’s also aggressive and progressive, a great thing for the league to have.

He’s also obscenely rich.

And what do you do if you’re obscenely rich?

You put up $100,000 to try and get Michael Jordan to face Bryon Russell one-on one. Of course.

Make no mistake, he’s serious. He actually says in the post he’s been in contact with Russell and a person “close to MJ” about it. He wants a 15 minute pick up game at half-time of a Utah Flash game.  The winner gets $100k to the charity of their choice. And bragging rights. Which would mean redemption for Russell and a chance for Jordan to prove his point he made at his oh, so eloquent HOF acceptance speech.

I gotta hand it to Anderson, dude’s doing his part to drum up attention for the D-League. Any news is good news for the league, and Anderson’s hijinx definitely will get some attention on them.

The odds of this occurring, of course, are abysmal. Jordan won’t leave his house for that much money, even if it’s for charity. And as much as he mouths off about it, he knows that the only way this could end is badly for him. He wins, so what? He’s the best, he’s still the best, against a retired player. He loses and that’s bad mojo. MJ controls his image too much to let this happen.

But man, if it did.

If by some cosmic intervention this thing actually comes to light? ESPN MUST air this thing. It should take place in between two games. TNT would be better, but ESPN usually gets first right of refusal. This would be high comedy. If we could only get Tim Hardaway against John Amaechi in the opener, this card would be stacked! Party time in Orem!

Matt Moore

Matt Moore is a Senior NBA Blogger for CBSSports.com's Eye on Basketball blog, weekend editor of Pro Basketball Talk on NBCSports.com, and co-editor of Voice on the Floor. He lives in Kansas City due to an unbelievably complex set of circumstances and enjoys mid-90's pop rock, long walks on the beach and the novels of Tim Sandlin.