It Was the Age of Wisdom

Ricky Rubio is staying in Europe, and I should be disappointed.  I’ve been suckered into the thinking that Rubio’s capable of expanding the YouTube highlight reel into space and time, and that metaphysical revolution will have to be put on hold for reasons that have little to do with Ricky’s basketball development.  I touted Rubio as one of the can’t-miss prospects in the draft, and was genuinely intrigued to see if his style could play nice with that of Al Jefferson and Kevin Love.

Ricky Rubio is staying in Europe, and I should be disappointed.  But I’m not.  Not even in the slightest.  I’d be more broken up if I stepped on a piece of gum today, or dropped something in that no man’s land between the counter and the fridge.  Modern tragedies, admittedly, but not quite what I had in mind.  And I owe it all to the draft’s best consolation prize: Jonny Flynn.

Ricky Rubio is staying in Europe, and I should be disappointed.  But if Rubio’s tease pushes the Wolves’ 2009-2010 season into despair, Flynn’s promise does as much to fill the franchise with hope.  And now, rather than watching two point guards step on each other’s toes, NBA fans will be granted access to Flynn, undisturbed, and unhindered.  Really, Flynn seems like a more natural fit with the Timberwolves’ core.  He’s a change of pace point guard, with the quickness to turn the pick and roll into an issue of national security and the outright speed to run a one-man fast break.  He’s essentially everything that former T-Wolf Sebastian Telfair was supposed to be, but fell short: a confident playmaker, a heady scorer, a solid shooter, and a good defender given his size.  Oh yeah, and he can do this.  But stripped of Telfair’s hype (Although he was a lottery pick, Flynn’s pub doesn’t quite match up to the likes of draft mates Steph Curry or Tyreke Evans), Flynn is left to his own devices as a tremendous talent with a bright future.

Ricky Rubio is staying in Europe, and I should be disappointed.  Does that mean we were never meant to be?  Look, Ricky, it’s nothing personal.  Maybe we would have had something special together.  But logistically, it doesn’t make sense right now.  In two years, when you’ve crossed the realm from internet sensation to actual NBA commodity…things could be different.  You’ll be a different player, and hopefully a more evolved one, and I’ll welcome you with open arms.  You may always be Mr. Right, but Jonny is Mr. Right Now.  And you know what?  I’m giddy.  Go abroad.  Expand your game on those lesser stages, and come back to fanfare in 2011.  It’s for the best.

Seth Carstens