The Revolution Won’t Be Televised But It Will Be In New York Magazine, Apparently

In case you haven’t heard the news, Deadspin editor Will Leitch announced he’s leaving Deadspin today for a position with New York Magazine. He’ll continue to write for Deadspin, hopefully in the 1st person plural, but will no longer be acting editor of Deadspin.com. We wish Will all the luck in the world, not that he’ll need it, as he is one of the most gifted individuals we’ve encountered on ye old internets, and we have full confidence that this will simply be the next in a series of professional triumphs for him.

That’s our formal statement.

Here’s mine.

I decided to do a quick search for “Deadspin” in my “Gmail” which serves as my “Email client” on my “computer.” The search returned 378 entries since July of 2006, but I know I was aware of it long before then. I don’t remember the first post I read on Deadspin, but I know it changed the way I looked at sports.

Like most of the ever-growing throngs of commenters that prowl the site, and the millions more that just stop by to read it, Deadspin changed the entire game for me. It was everything you wanted to read about sports, but weren’t provided. It was honest. It was irreverent. And it was really, really f*cking funny. It was this whole community of people who made the same kind of jokes I did (read: only much funnier) and thought about the game the way I did (read: only much smarter). It was a touch of poetry, a touch of news, and a touch of insanity. There’s certainly criticism to be had about it, and the debates of its merits are not unfounded.

Through Deadspin, I found TrueHoop, and the Basketball Jones. I found KSK, and Free Darko. It made me think that maybe, possibly, I could start a blog and be a part of whatever the hell this thing is, and that’s what I did last year. And this has been the most fun I’ve had doing anything professionally, hands down. And I owe Will a hand in that.

I was even lucky enough to write for Deadspin, when Will was kind enough to let me cover the All-Star game and the D-League festivities, which got me boosted to a whole new level. Writing for Deadspin is one of the things I’m most proud of, and being able to say I did it is still really pretty cool to me. I owe Will for that as well.

It’s not a surprise that he’s taking off for greener pastures. Those I’ve talked to have generally had the same reaction I did. It’s not a shock, but it’s still pretty sad. It’s the end of an era, and one that I’ve enjoyed immensely.

Whoever takes over the reins, you’ve got our support. And by support, I mean a constant stream of links as we beg and plead for attention and hits. I’m certain that whoever is selected for the gig will do a great job, and keep up images of drunk athletes and criticisms of the WWL in full effect. Deadspin doesn’t die. It multiplies. You can only make it stronger.

But still, I’m a little bit sad. Change of this kind always kind of sucks, and we’ll miss the floppy headed missives about the Cardinals and the Buzzsaw, and we’ll miss the way he’d manage to come off as bold, yet completely confused and self-deprecating. We wish we could quit you, Will Leitch.

It’s the end of an era, and a time to congratulate someone we know only through email on a new job that brings new possibilities. Though it is ironic that the leader of the revolucion is now going to mainstream print. That seems oddly fitting in the context of the absurdity of the blogosphere.
Pour one out for Leitch’s Deadspin.com, boys and girls. It’ll go on, but it’ll never be the same.

Hardwood Paroxysm